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on who is taking part in the ceremony. a civil rights legacy lives on. stay with us. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> in less than two weeks, roberts will swear in president obama for his second term in office. as many as 800,000 visitors will be in washington for the inauguration. and crews are hard at work for the inaugural platform outside the capitol. it's a big day and the president set a big agenda to match it. he plans to tackle immigration, gun control, climate change, and tax reform in his second term. and with four years in office under his belt, this president knows what he wants and he's confident he'll get it. joining me now is democratic strategist margie omero and victoria defrancesco soto, a fellow at the university of texas and an msnbc contributor. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> victoria, how does the president keep the momentu
time in the most dramatic possible way. we had the chance conversations of the civil rights movement, and a life or death decisions be made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my father installed the system it as a lover of history i know he would've been drawn to this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. and after the bay of pigs disaster, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily accessible until now. the original recordings are of varying quality and it isn't always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with maura, our outstanding archivist and her colleagues here at the libra, historian ted widmer did an incredible job of selecting highlights from the most significant crises as well as excerpts to show the range and complexity of issues facing the president. as a citizen in an election seaso
that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last several years litigating to prevent long-term isolation and to create benchmarks programs, access to se
point to point as we were advised by my iconic hero, a civil-rights hero, first assessments of rice division. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we were constantly aware of who might come upon to the campus. did not look like a student, had been to mine in a deer rifle and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple of days reading the hate mail, the death threats. a very detailed. we know where you live, or your parents are. or going to kill you, your tolerance. and i looked at janzen said to have you read this one. he looked back and said the limelight from a spanish class. let's go. that can the bridge every state with him in that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never crack troubling to. the students plan to. i should say that 99 percent of the student body went about their weight inning and education. they cared little about him being on the campus. to
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
in on this stuff partly because of the history of what the civil rights movement faced and -- >> look, we're not a national security group. we're a freedom group and this is about freedom at the end of the day. this country, we used to be completely opposed to the government spying on your mail, but now it's online and we're apparently cool with, you can read all my e-mail and listen to all ni cell phone conversations. that's a big problem. >> although that's one thing congress did right but i'll get back to that. >> you know, the -- as far as we know, right? >> right. >> i live a few miles from the national security agency, who knows with them? but with the usa patriot act, its definition of terrorism says, if you break a law while p putting lives in danger, seeking to influence policy in the united states, you've violated the patriot act. that's like everything martin luther king did in public. >> breaking laws? law plauzbly, who knows. >> birmingham, the children's march, the march on washington, the march -- every anti-abortion protest? any time you're in the street you put people in
funded runaway slaves. she actually--some of the early landmark civil rights cases in california she funded. and then--and near the end of her life, things became even more bizarre. she was sort of connected to a very wealthy senator from--state senator from california and was taken to court and so it just becomes, you know, this saga. but as a figure, i mean, she's just inspirational and just formidable. c-span: $30, 643 pages for your book. where did you write it? >> guest: wrote it all over the world. i actually--you know, i was in north carolina after i did the initial traveling, i did some there. i went to new york where i had been living for 13 years. c-span: what were you doing in new york? >> guest: well, i taught at columbia and sarah lawrence college. i was for a year at the university--i'm sorry--at the american academy in rome, the rome prize. so that was where the bulk of it was actually completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to liv
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
what is realistic and what's not and that assault weapons ban is right there smack in the middle of everything. >> thanks very much, gloria. >>> more than half a million people are fleeing syria's civil war and now winter is compounding the misery for many refugees. >>> plus, details from this spectacular winter phenomena. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance,
string. so there's a balancing act here as the clock winds down. >> i think that's right. i don't think we're looking at a second and third-string problem at this point. jack lew is by any measure a first-string civil servant. but i think your broader point is correct. you think about the bush administration. you saw hank paulson come in at treasury, bob gates at defense. i think both proved to be important in their roles. that doesn't need you need quite the same changeover. one lien is that the predecessors were considered failures. tim geithner's tenure has been controversial but i think broadly speaking what he did to write the financial system will be considered a tremendous achievement in the annals of economic policy-making. but again, they are in something of a rut, i think, in their economic policy-making at this point, and particularly in their approach to dealing with republicans. a lot of that, i'd say frankly the bulk of that blame falls on the house republicans and john boehner. but it's nevertheless a case that they just put somebody into the treasury department who they
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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